I don’t mean getting rid of the law itself, but rather ending the actual publication of statutes and other legal information in book form. The book I’m currently reading for pleasure features an outstanding logical structure. Everything I need to understand the page I’m reading is detailed on the preceding pages. The fact that I’m reading it on my ereader doesn’t make a difference. Statute books, by comparison, aren't meant to be read sequentially – yet a huge number of repealed Swiss decrees are still published as PDFs, which are ideal for printing out but a disaster for subsequent use in digital systems.

Even the new Akoma Ntoso schema, which is supposed to be implemented for Swiss federal legislation in the future, is structured in much the same way as a book, with one XML file per piece of legislation. There was an interesting discussion on this topic recently in a colloquium at the University of Zurich’s Faculty of Law: “Maschinelle Gesetzestextanalyse – neue Möglichkeiten für die Rechtsetzungslehre?” (Machine-based legal text analysis – new opportunities for legislative studies?) One speaker was in favor of the Akoma Ntoso format; the other was against it due to analytical limitations.

Everyone is talking about legal tech and digitalization. It’s important to make the relevant information available so that it can be evaluated digitally. This is particularly the case in the area of compliance, which still has high potential for automation. So the question arises: when will statute books and other legal sources be replaced by databases?

Complete Revision of the Federal Data Protection Act

The complete revision's draft of the Federal Data Protection Act is currently in political consultation. Data Protection is to be increased by giving people more control over their private data as well as reinforcing transparancy regarding the handling of confidential data.

Links: draft, report

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